Flight To The Ford Pt. 2, The Lord Of The Rings | SFP017

Finding Bilbo’s famed stoned trolls provided the hobbits a brief respite from the terror of the Black Riders. Getting back to their flight to the ford of Bruinen they meet the Elf-lord Glorfindel who gives Frodo his horse to bear him swiftly to Rivendell. Join us for an adventure as we continue chapter twelve of The Lord of the Rings.

Flight To The Ford Of Bruinen

After examining the hobbit’s wound Glorfindel, disquieted and anxious, placed Frodo upon his horse.

His pace is light and smooth; and if danger presses too near, he will bear you away with a speed that even the black steeds of the enemy cannot rival.

The Lord Of The Rings, Flight To The Ford, p. 210

Suddenly the horse’s speed and resolve was put to the test, for the Black Riders were upon Frodo. The pursuit led all the way to the Ford of Bruinen. As Frodo was crossing the Loudwater he felt that he was being commanded to halt. The Riders had a power over him. Just as they were crossing to capture their prey – a eucatastrophe! A wall of water – white foam as flames on its crest with riders and horses frothing amid it all – carried away the Black Riders.

Through The Loudwater

One cannot help but be reminded of the Red Sea crossing as recorded in Exodus chapter fourteen. Perhaps J.R.R. Tolkien himself was drawing inspiration from the account when crafting Frodo’s dramatic flight to the Ford. The parting of the waters, the salvation of the Hebrews, and the defeat of the Egyptian army echoes throughout the entirety of scripture. The children of Israel are reminded over and over to recall the battle that God fought on their behalf and for their redemption.

Psalms 106:10-11 NASB

So He saved them from the hand of the one who hated them,
And redeemed them from the hand of the enemy.
The waters covered their adversaries;
Not one of them was left.

In like manner the waves crashing down upon the Black Riders was a miraculous event. We are eager to discover more about who or what was behind it all. Join us as we continue the adventure!

This image shows J.R.R. Tolkien sitting under a tree with a quote from letter 213, "I am a Christian (which can be deduced from my stories), and in fact a Roman Catholic."

What stood out to you in the FLIGHT TO THE FORD? Let us know in the comments below.

On The Secret Fire Podcast we travel chapter-by-chapter and book-by-book through J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth viewing it through Christian lenses. We invite you to join us each week as we continue the adventure on the Arkenstone server in Lord Of The Rings Online.

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  • I was listening to you guys talking about the Istari, and how Istari and Maiar compare as categories, and I tend to think of Istari as somewhat comparable to Apostles. Istari means something like “those who know” and Apostle means something like “one who is sent.” In both cases, a being who is defined, at least in part, by their calling: to know, or to go. I think that one could compare Gandalf to an Apostle, much moreso than Radagast or Saruman, or Alatar and Pallando (the two Blue Wizards, about whom we know almost nothing).

    Anyway, maybe (using the singular terms) Maia : Istar :: Saint : Apostle.

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